Showing posts with label B. Harrison. Show all posts
Showing posts with label B. Harrison. Show all posts

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

The Case of Joe Martin (and the Headless Corpse)

The following post is from a paper presented by P.S. Ruckman, Jr., at the “Theodore Roosevelt: Life, Times and Legacy” conference. Louisiana State University (Shreveport). October 17-20, 2012. 

One day, Ernest Adams picked up a club and attacked Joe Martin, a citizen of Yell County, Arkansas. Martin managed to escape and retreated to his own home. Adams went to a friend’s house, borrowed a Winchester rifle and made his way to the Martin residence. As he approached the front door, Adams saw Martin sitting in a chair with his 4-year-old daughter, Nora, in his lap. Adams then threatened to kill Martin, but Martin pled with Adams not to have the poor taste to commit murder right in front of his family. So, Adams forced Martin down a road and along a path.

Later, Martin's family heard a rifle shot coming from the woods. But, to their general astonishment, Joe Martin emerged alive. And Ernest Adams was nowhere to be seen. Martin later claimed that, as he and Adams were walking along, they both thought that they heard the sound of another man’s footsteps in the woods. In that slight moment of concern and hesitation, Martin grabbed Adams’ gun and a struggle ensued. Martin said he then shot Adams in self-defense.

Later, the body of a man was found floating in the Red River. It was wrapped in a bed quilt that was later linked to Martin. Unfortunately, the head of the corpse had been removed. As a result, the identification process was said to have been “very incomplete.”

Saturday, March 27, 2010

Benjamin Harrison, Pardons and Military Mercy

In his 1897 work, This Country of Ours, Benjamin Harrison called the pardoning power "one of the great executive powers." Harrison described the power to pardon as a remedy for "rigidity" in the criminal code, "the liability to error of every human tribunal" and the discovery of "new evidence" or "extenuating facts." But, he also noted that it was "not a pleasant thing to have the power of life and death. No graver or more oppressive responsibility can be laid upon a public officer."

Harrison's book also noted there was "an increasing amount of pardon business" coming to the desk of the President and he "often has many cases waiting." In March of 1890, the New York Times reported Harrison “stirred up the whole army establishment” by remitting the unexpired portion of a one-year sentence imposed upon trooper Dell P. Wild of the Eight Cavalry at Fort Yates, North Dakota. A lieutenant had asked Wild to assist him with the placement of a canvass on the roof of a shed behind his personal quarters. When Wild complained that he was not a servant, the lieutenant struck him then had him arrested. Harrison’s pardon came after the United States Senate had passed a resolution calling for the Secretary of War to produce a record of the trial.

Monday, December 1, 2008

Context: Amnesties (or Blanket Pardons)

Washington - July 10 1795, Whiskey Insurrectionists
Adams - May 21 1800, Pennsylvania Insurrectionists (Fries Rebellion)
Jefferson - October 15 1807, Military deserters (if surrendered in 4 months)
Madison - February 7 1812, Military deserters (if surrendered in 4 months)
Madison - October 8 1812, Military deserters (if surrendered in 4 months)
Madison - June 14 1814, Military deserters (if surrendered in 4 months)
Madison - February 6 1815, Pirates participating in War of 1812
Jackson - June 12 1830, Military deserters discharged, those confined released
Buchanan - April 6, 1858, Utah uprising
Lincoln - February 14 1862, Political prisoners paroled
Lincoln - March 10 1863, Military deserters restored with only forfeiture of pay
Lincoln - December 8 1863, “Rebellion” participants (with exceptions) subject to oath
Lincoln - February 26 1864, Military deserters sentences mitigated, restored to duty
Lincoln - March 26 1864, Clarification of December 8, 1863, amnesty
Lincoln - March 11 1865, Military deserters (if returned to post in 60 days)
Johnson - May 29 1865, Certain rebels of Confederate States
Johnson - May 4 1866, Clarification of previous amnesty
Johnson - July 3 1866, Military deserters restored with only forfeiture of pay
Johnson - September 7 1867, Confederates (excepting certain officers) subject to oath
Johnson - July 4 1868, Confederates (except those indicted for treason or felony)
Johnson - December 25 1868, Confederates (universal and unconditional)
Harrison - January 4 1893, Mormons practicing polygamy
Cleveland - September 25 1894, Mormons practicing polygamy
T. Roosevelt - July 4 1902, Philippine insurrectionists, subject to oath
Wilson - June 14 1917 5,000, Persons under suspended sentences
Wilson - August 21 1917, Clarification, reaffirmation of June 14 amnesty
Coolidge - December 15 1923, Espionage Act
Coolidge - March 5 1924, Over 100 military deserters. Restoration of citizenship.
F. Roosevelt - December 23 1933, Over 1,500 who violated Espionage or Draft laws.
Truman - December 24 1945, Thousands of ex-convicts serving at least 1 year in war
Truman - December 23 1947, 1,523 draft evaders (recommended by Amnesty Board)
Truman - December 24 1952, Convicts serving armed forces at least 1 year since 1950
Truman - December 24 1952, Military deserters convicted between 1945 and 1950
Ford - September 16 1974, Vietnam draft evaders. Conditioned on public service
Carter - January 21 1977, Vietnam draft evaders. Unconditional pardon

* For additional updating / commentary on this list, contact the Editor of this blog.

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